Articles

Hydroponic Systems

by Ashley Beaudoin, Owner of Bend’s Indoor Garden Station (B.I.G.S.) Did you know 80 percent of all cut flowers and herbs in your local store are hydroponically grown? Did you know that a plant will spend over 50 percent of its energy rooting through soil to find oxygen and nutrients? When you are in control of all the growth factors, you are rewarded by twice the growth rate, higher yields and blooms! Before you dive…


Winter 2018 Editorial

by Ryan Moeggenberg When I tell people about HomeSpun and talk about growing our food, they often have excuses why they don’t try to grow anything. “Our growing season is too short,” or “The soil here is just lava sand. It won’t grow anything.” This issue of HomeSpun Magazine is all about showing you ways to grow food in Central Oregon that aren’t subject to soil or weather! Hydroponics, aquaponics and aeroponics are different ways…


Fresh. Organic. Local

We live in a desert. And although water shortages are not always top of mind, the fact is that Central Oregon faces extreme drought conditions and our environment is suffering. The lack of water is on top of already difficult growing conditions that farmers struggle with here in the high desert: poor soil, cold winters, hot summers, pests, predators, etc. These are some of the reasons why Jimmy and Shannon Sbarra decided to start Volcano…


Obsidian Stout — Shallot Cream Sauce

by Chef Brian Kerr of Deschutes Brewery & Public House 1044 NW Bond St., Bend • 541-382-9242 • www.deschutesbrewery.com   Ingredients 4 oz butter 4 oz minced shallots 1 oz minced garlic 6 fl oz Obsidian Stout beer 6 fl oz beef broth, richly flavored 1 cup rich tomato puree 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper 1/2 tsp sea salt 8 fl oz heavy cream 2-4 Tbls chilled butter 1/3 cup finely chopped curly parsley…


Sweet Rewards Part 2:

Fruit Tree Pruning Basics by Robin Snyder, Tumalo Garden Market Many people feel that fruit tree pruning is too complex a task to be done by amateurs, but when we amateurs learn a few basic concepts, we can keep our fruit trees healthy, well-shaped and bearing excellent fruit. It’s simple: Learn the two basic pruning cuts, get equipped with good tools and keep in mind your long-term goals when pruning. Fruit trees do survive our…


Tower Garden

A Fully Automated Vertical Aeroponic System by Ryan Moeggenberg I feel that food you grow yourself is better than any other option. You have full control of the quality and know every step of the process it went through to get to your table. For this reason we want to grow as much of our family’s food as possible but we have a few complications to consider. First, we don’t own the property we live…


Pumpkin Pie Spice Chili

by Savory Spice • Bend – Old Mill District 375 SW Powerhouse Dr., Bend • 541-306-6855 Ingredients For Pumpkin: 2 small whole pie pumpkins* Olive oil, for drizzling Salt & pepper, to season For Chili: 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 lb. ground turkey 1 large yellow onion, diced 1/2 tsp. Dehydrated Minced Garlic (or 2 cloves, minced) 2 Tbsp. Medium Chili Powder 1 Tbsp. Pumpkin Pie Spice 1 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. Coarse Black Malabar Pepper…


Everything gets a Sauce

by Brian Kerr, Executive Chef, Deschutes Brewery & Public House I recently had surgery on my shoulder and was out of work for over a month. I didn’t just sit around idly wasting my time though, I took the opportunity to venture out into our city to try out some of the great burgers at various locations. I was really impressed by several of them, including those restaurants that say they serve the world’s best…


Barb’s Biscuits

Sourdough Biscuits by the MoeGang Household Mix together: 1/2 cup sourdough starter* 1 cup milk 1 cup flour Cover and let stand in a warm place 4-8 hours. * If you don’t have your sourdough starter handy, jump on the HomeSpun Magazine Facebook Group and let us know you would like some. We got ours from our friend Barb, her grandmother started it on their homestead in Stayton over 80 years ago. Then add: 1…


Backyard Bees

by Kim Rivera, Backyard Bees of Bend October is, as far as local honeybees are concerned, the start of winter. November is the first month of solid seclusion in survival mode for the colony. Specially nourished bees — called winter bees — are in force, maintaining the colony’s warmth. These specialized bees create a heater effect by using wing and abdominal muscles to generate warmth. Bees cluster in the wintertime and stay in a state…